Union monuments at Gettysburg > Pennsylvania > Artillery 


Pennsylvania Independent Battery C and Pennsylvania Independent Battery F had been consolidated in June of 1863 due to casualties from the Battle of Chancellorsville. They were separated again in March of 1964, but at Gettysburg they fought as one battery. The batteries were commanded by Captain James Thompson, and brought six 3″ Ordnance rifles to the field.

The original monument to the combined batteries was dedicated in 1885 across Hancock Avenue from where the State of Pennsylvania monument would later be erected. (Hancock Avenue Part 2 tour map) When the state of Pennsylvania made funds available for Civil War monuments each battery chose to create its own individual monument at Gettysburg, standing a few yards apart at the Peach Orchard. Both were dedicated in 1893 by the State of Pennsylvania. (Peach Orchard tour map

The Medal of honor as it looked at the time of the Civil War Casper R. Carlisle of Battery F was awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions on July 2nd when he saved a gun of his battery under heavy musketry fire, most of the horses being killed and the drivers wounded.

 

Monument to Battery C, Pennsylvania Light Artillery

Monument to Pennsylvania Batteries C & F Consolidated at Gettysburg

Monument to Battery C, Pennsylvania Light Artillery

From the front:

Battery C Penna. Light Artillery
(Thompson’s
)

Rear view of the monument to the Pennsylvania Independent Light Artillery, Battery C at Gettysburg

From the rear of the monument to Battery C:

July 2. Occupied this position from about 5 to 6 O’Clock p.m.
July 3rd. In position on right of First Volunteer
Brigade Reserve Artillery and engaged the enemy. 
Recruited at Pittsburgh. 
Total enrollment 325. Killed and died of wounds 4 men.
Died of disease etc. 11 men. wounded 5 officers and 35 men.
Captured or missing 9 men. Total Casualties 64

Mustered in November 6, 1861. Re-enlisted January 11, 1864.
Mustered out June 30, 1865.

Present at Gettysburg (Consolidated Battery C&F)
105 officers and men. Died of wounds 1 man.
Wounded 3 officers and 7 men. Captured or missing 3 men. Total loss 14.

From June 3 1863 to March 25th 1864 Batteries C&F served
as a consolidated battery.
Rappahannock Station, Cedar Mountain, Crooked Run,
Rappahannock Station, Thoroughfare Gap,
2nd Bull Run, Chantilly, Antietam, Fredericksburg,
Purdy’s Dam, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg,
Mitchell’s Ford, Mine Run, Morton’s Ford.

Monument to Pennsylvania Independent Battery C on the Gettysburg battlefield

Location of the monument to Battery C, Pennsylvania Light Artillery

The monument to Pennsylvania Independent Battery C is southwest of Gettysburg at the Peach Orchard, along Wheatfield Road and 40 yards east of Emmitsburg Road. (39°48’05.2″N 77°14’58.9″W)

 

Monument to Battery F, Pennsylvania Light Artillery

Monument to Pennsylvania Independent Battery F at Gettysburg

Monument to Battery F, Pennsylvania Light Artillery at Gettysburg

From the inscriptions on the top and bottom front of the monument:

F, Penna. Light Artillery
Hampton’s Battery

From the scroll clutched in the eagle’s talons above the shields on the front of the monument:

Organized at Pittsburg

From the tablet on the right side of the monument:

From June 3 1863 to March 25 1864
Batteries F and C served as a 
consolidated battery.
July 2. Occupied this position from
about 5 to 6 O’Clock p.m. July 3. With 
the left centre on Cemetery Ridge 
on left of First Volunteer Brigade 
Reserve Artillery marked by tablet. 
24 men from Battery F were detailed
 to Battery H 1st Ohio Artillery 
posted in the cemetery during
the battle.

From the left side of the monument:

Mustered in Oct. 8, 1861
Re-enlisted Feb. 27, 1864
Mustered out June 26, 1865

Monument to Pennsylvania Independent Battery F at Gettysburg

Location of the monument to Battery F, Pennsylvania Light Artillery

The monument to Pennsylvania Independent Battery F is southwest of Gettysburg at the Peach Orchard, along Wheatfield Road and 68 yards east of Emmitsburg Road. (39°48’05.2″N 77°14’58.9″W)

 

Monument to the combined batteries C & F on Hancock Avenue

This was the original monument to the combined batteries, erected in 1883 by the survivors. It marks the location of the batteries during Pickett’s Charge on July 3.

Monument to Pennsylvania Consolidated Batteries C & F on Hancock Avenue at Gettysburgv

Looking southwest from Hancock Avenue in front of the Pennsylvania Monument. In the distance to the left of the monument is the Trostle Farm, and on the far right the Klingle Farm.

C&F Indp’t Penn’a Artillery

Position occupied
 Indp’t Pa. Art’y F
Hampton’s Battery, July 3 A.D. 1863

Organized at Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Oct. 8th 1861.
Mustered out of United States Service 
June 24, 1865

On this field the following members fell
Joseph L. Miller
Jos. B. Todd – Adam Rath
Jacob Keirch – Hugh Purdy
John H. Herbert – Cha’s. R. Bright
And eleven men were wounded

This tablet
erected to their memory
by the surviving members of 
the battery July 3rd 1885

monument on Hancock Avenue to Pennsylvania Batteries C & F Consolidated at Gettysburg

Location of the monument to the Consolidated Batteries C&F, Pennsylvania Light Artillery

The monument to the combined Pennsylvania Independent Batteries C & F showing their position on July 3 during Pickett’s Charge is on the west side of Hancock Avenue in front of the State of Pennsylvania monument. (39°48’26.4″N 77°14’08.1″W)

See more about Pennsylvania Independent Battery C or Pennsylvania Independent Battery F in the Civil War.