Gettysburg Farms & Buildings


The Trostle farm at Gettysburg

View of the Trostle farm buildings from United States Avenue

The Trostle farm is south of Gettysburg on what is now United States Avenue. (Google map) Owned by Peter Trostle, it was occupied at the time of the battle by his son Abraham, Abraham’s wife Catherine, and their nine children. The 134 acre farm included a new frame house, brick barn, corn crib, wagon shed, springhouse, and a brick smokeouse.

The side of the Troste House along United States Avenue and an outbuiling

The side of the Troste House along United States Avenue and an outbuiling

Major General Daniel Sickles used the farm as his headquarters after he advanced his Third Army Corps to the line of the Emmitsburg Road on July 2nd. He was wounded in the field to the west of the barn, where a monument now stands.

The Trostles were abruptly forced from their home during the fighting, leaving dinner on the table, which was enjoyed by Sickles’ staff. Like many of their neighbors, the Trostles returned to find most of their belongings looted or destroyed.

The 9th Massachusetts Battery had fought a desperate last stand on their farm, with at least sixteen dead battery horses just in the front yard and over a hundred on the farm. Damage to property and real estate was estimated a $2,500 in a claim filed fter the war, but it appears no compensation was ever paid.

The monument to the 9th Massachusetts Battery beside the Trostle farmhouse

The monument to the 9th Massachusetts Battery beside the Trostle farmhouse

The farm was sold by the Trostle heirs to the Park Service in 1899. You can still see battle damage, including the famous shell hole in the brickwork of the barn. The Park Service has used the house for several years as a dorm for college history interns doing summer studies at the park.

View from the front porch of the Trostle farmhouse into the yard.

View from the front porch of the Trostle farmhouse into the yard.

The Trostle barn from the Sickles monument on the Gettysburg battlefield.

The Trostle barn from the Sickles monument, looking east. The house is on the other side of the barn.

The Trostle barn, showing the shell hole in the brick.

South side of the Trostle barn, showing the shell hole in the brick.

Closeup of the battle damage to the Trostle barn

Closeup of the battle damage to the Trostle barn

View from inside the Trostle barn on the Gettysburg battlefield

View from inside the Trostle barn sowing the famous shell hole

View of the lower floor of the Trostle barn on the Gettysburg battlefield

View of the lower floor of the Trostle barn

The east side of the Trostle barn, showing a number of bullet holes

The east side of the Trostle barn, showing a number of bullet holes