Union Monuments at Gettysburg > Massachusetts


There are three monumrents to the Ninth Massachusetts Battery on the Civil War battlefield of Gettysburg. The main monument is on Wheatfield Road, the second at the Trostle Farm (Tour map: Sickles Ave. at Excelsior Field) and the third is in Zeigler’s Grove just north of the Bryan Farm. (Tour map: Hancock Avenue at Ziegler’s GroveGoogle maps to all three monuments)

Monument to the 9th Massachusetts Battery at Gettysburg

The battery was commanded by Captain John Bigelow, who was wounded on July 2nd. Lieutenant Richard S. Milton then took command. The 9th brought 110 men to the field serving six 12-pounder Napoleons. It was part of Artillery Reserve, 1st Volunteer Brigade.

The Medal of honor as it looked at the time of the Civil War

Bugler Charles W. Reed received the Medal of Honor for his actions at Gettysburg on July 2nd when he rescued his wounded captain from between the lines.

From the front of the Wheatfield Road monument:

Ninth Mass. Battery
Captain Bigelow
July 2, 1863.
Killed          Wounded
2    Officers    1
3 Non-comm officers 6
5   Enlisted men   13
10     Total     20
80 Horses

Looking north from Wheatfield Road. The roof of the Trostle barn is visible to the upper left of the left wheel of the right cannon. The pieces are 12 pounder Napoleons.

Looking north from Wheatfield Road. The roof of the Trostle barn is visible to the upper left of the left wheel of the right cannon. The pieces are 12 pounder Napoleons.

From the tablet on the rear of the Wheatfield Road monument:

9th Massachusetts Battery
Capt. John Bigelow
1st position left gun Wheatfield Road
4:30 to 6 p.m. July 2, 1863.

Shelled Confederate Batteries on Emmitsburg Road also the enemy around Rose Farm buildings. Enfiladed with canister Kershaw’s Brigade C.S.A. moving across field in front from Emmitsburg Road to woods on left where battle was raging in front of Round Tops.

6 p.m. – alone on field. Graham’s Brigade 3rd Corps forced from Peach Orchard had retired by detachments.

By ‘prolonge firing’ retired before Kershaw’s skirmishers and Barksdale’s Brigade C.S.A. 400 yards.

2nd position angle of stone wall near Trostle’s House where the Battery was halted by Lieut. Colonel McGilvery and ordered to hold enemy in check until line of artillery could be formed 560 yards in the rear. Was without support and hemmed in by stone wall. Enemy closed in on flanks. Man and horses were shot down when finally overcome at 6:30 p.m. Lieut.-Colonel McGilvery had batteries unsupported in position near  the Weikert House covering opening in lines between Round Tops and left of 2nd Corps 3/4  mile occasioned by withdrawal of Graham’s  Brigade.

7:15 p.m. Willard’s Brigade 2nd Corps and  later Lockwood’s Brigade 12th Corps came  to support of artillery.

8 p.m. the enemy finally repulsed.

Monument to the 9th Massachusetts Battery at the Trostle Farm on the Gettysburg battlefield

Monument to the 9th Massachusetts Battery at the Trostle Farm

From the monument by the Trostle Farm:

2nd position
6 p.m. July 2, 1863.

Ninth Mass. Battery
Capt. Bigelow

“By prolongue retired firing”  from the crossroads 400 yds. distant  without infantry support before Barksdale’s Confed. Brigade. Final stand made across this road.

Monument to the 9th Massachusetts Battery in Ziegler's Grove

Monument to the 9th Massachusetts Battery in Ziegler’s Grove

From the monument in Ziegler’s Grove:

Ninth Mass. Battery
Capt. Bigelow
July 3d and 4th 1863.
Two guns
Lt. Milton comdg.
Only officer and guns effective after engagement on Trostle’s farm, July 2nd, 1863

See more on the Ninth Massachusetts Battery in the Civil War