Union monuments at GettysburgMaine at Gettysburg


The monument to the 7th Maine Volunteer Infantry Regiment is southeast of Gettysburg on Neill Avenue, a difficult to reach area surrounded by private property. (39.807889° N, 77.210646° W; Google map)

Monument to the 7th Maine Infantry at Gettysburg

About the monument to the 7th Maine

The nine foot tall granite monument represents the National Shield leaning against a boulder. The Greek cross symbol of the Sixth Corps is superimposed on the shield, bearing an inscription of the regimental information. The monument was dedicated in 1889 by the State of Maine.

The 7th Maine at the Battle of Gettysburg

The 7th Maine Volunteer Infantry was commanded at the Battle of Gettysburg by Lieutenant Colonel Selden Connor. Connor was an 1859 graduate of Tufts College who was studying law when the war broke out. Like his famous counterpart in the 20th Maine, he went on to become a general and the governor of the state. He also designed the Gettysburg monument.

The regiment brought 261 men to Gettysburg in six companies: B,C,D,F,I and K. The remaining companies were in Maine recruiting.

6th Corps Headquarters Flag 6C-2D
Attached to the 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division6th Corps

Neill’s Brigade of the Sixth Corps was one of the last to reach the battlefield on July 2nd and was held in reserve on the Baltimore Pike at Rock Creek. On July 3rd the brigade deployed to the north of the road to push back Confederate skirmshers that were threatening the army’s main supply and communcations route. It advanced to the location of the monuments, taking light casualties. The 7th Maine suffered six wounded.

From the monument:

7th Maine Infantry
3rd Brig. 2nd Div. 6th Corps
July 3d, 1863

Union Lt. Colonel (later Brigadier General) Selden Connor

Union Lt. Colonel (later Brigadier General) Selden Connor

 See more about the 7th Maine Volunteer Infantry Regiment in the Civil War