Union monuments at Gettysburg > Vermont


The monument to the 14th Vermont Volunteer Infantry Regiment is south of Gettysburg on Hancock Avenue. (39.80882° N, 77.236594° W; Google map; Tour map: Hancock Avenue Part 2) It was dedicated on October 19, 1899 by the State of Vermont.

Monument to the 14th Vermont Volunteer Infantry Regiment at Gettysburg

About the 14th Vermont Infantry monument

The monument is of polished Barre Granite from Vermont that stands 14′ 6″ tall. The shaft of the monument tapers from 3′ 6″ to a point , and stands on a 4′ 6″ diameter base. The front of the spire in inscribed with the regiment’s information.

The 14th Vermont Infantry at the Battle of Gettysburg

The 14th Vermont Infantry was commanded at the Battle of Gettysburg by Colonel William T. Nicholls, an attorney and state representative from Rutland. It brought 647 men to the field, one of the largest regiments in the battle.

The regiment was almost at the end of its nine month enlstment, most of which had been spent picketing rear areas around Washington. It was transferred to the Army of the Potomac just before the Battle of Gettysburg and reached Gettysburg after a hard six day march to join the First Corps on the evening of July 1st.

On July 3rd the 14th Vermont remained in line on Cemetery Ridge as Pickett’s Virginians swept past in their attack towards the Copse of Trees and two other Vermont regiments swung out of the Federal battle line to rake the Virginians in the flank. Then Lang’s Florida Brigade approached the Union lines in support of Pickett, and four companies of the 14th Vermont were ordered to swing out to attack them in the flank, throwing the Floridians back and taking many prisoners.

1st Corps Headquarters Flag 1C-3D

From the monument:

14th Vermont Volunteers
Col. W. T. Nichols,
Stannard’s Brigade
July 2 & 3, 1863.
19 killed, 76 wounded.

 See more on the history of the 14th Vermont Volunteer Infantry Regiment in the Civil War