The monument to the 107th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry Regiment is northwest of Gettysburg on Doubleday Avenue. (39.8419° N, 77.24271° W; Tour map: Doubleday – Robinson AvenuesGoogle maps to both monuments)

Monument to the 107th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry Regiment on the Gettysburg battlefield

A marker showing the position of the regiment on July 2nd is south of town next to the Bryan farm on Hancock Avenue (39.81581° N, 77.23529° W; Tour map: Hancock Avenue at Ziegler’s Grove)

The 107th Pennsylvania was commanded at the Battle of Gettysburg by Lieutenant Colonel James McThomson. He was wounded on July 1st, and Captain Emanuel D. Roath then took command.

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See Lt. Colonel McThomson’s & Captain Roath’s Official Reports for the 107th Pennsylvania in the Gettysburg Campaign.
1st Corps Headquarters Flag 1C-2D

From the front of the monument:

107th Penna. Infantry
1st Brig. 2d Div. 1st Corps

July 1. The regiment fought here from 1 P.M. until the Corps retired and then took position on the left of Cemetery Hill. In the evening of 2d. moved to the left to support the Second Corps, and after the repulse of the enemy returned to former position. On the 3d. moved several times to reinforce different parts of the line.

Mustered in Feb. and March 1862. Re-enlisted Feb. and March 1864. Mustered out July 13, 1865.

From the left side:

Present at Gettysburg
25 officers 230 enlisted men.
Killed and died of wounds 16 men,
Wounded 8 officers 43 men,
Captured or missing 6 officers 92 men,
Total loss 165.

From the right side:

Mustered in Feb. and March 1862,
Re-enlisted Feb. and March 1864.
Mustered out July 13, 1865.

Marker for the 107th Pennsylvania Infantry at Gettysburg

Marker on Hancock Avenue

From the marker on Hancock Avenue:

The 107th Regiment Pennsylvania Infantry occupied this position during a part of July 2nd 1863. Went into action July 1st with 255 officers and men. Lost during the three days in killed, wounded and missing 165 officers and men.

Looking west from Doubleday Avenue at the 107th Pennsylvania monument. The cavalry monuments along Buford Avenue can be seen across the fields in the distance.

Looking west from Doubleday Avenue at the main 107th Pennsylvania monument. The cavalry monuments along Buford Avenue can be seen in the distance.

See more on the 107th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry Regiment in the Civil War