The monument to the 10th Massachusetts Volunteers is south of Gettysburg on Sedgwick Avenue. (39.79637° N, 77.23419° W; Google map; Tour map: Sedgwick Avenue) It was dedicated on October 6, 1885 by the State of Massachusetts.

Monument to the 10th Massachusetts infantry at Gettysburg

About the monument to the 10th Massachusetts

The monument consists of a granite base supporting a bronze sculpture of a knapsack setting on a drum underneath three stacked muskets, with a canteen and cartridge box hanging from the muskets. The entire monument stands 8′ 4″ high. There are inscriptions on three sides of the monument while the fourth side has the Greek cross symbol of the Sixth Corps.

The 10th Massachusetts at Gettysburg

The 10th Massachusetts was commanded at the Battle of Gettysburg by Lieutenant Colonel Joseph B. Parsons. It brought 416 men to the field, losing 4 enlisted men wounded and 5 missing.

The regiment had marched 35 miles miles in 18 hours under a swealtering July sun to reach the battlefield on July 2nd. They were put in a support position behind the Round Tops, then were moved north on July 3rd. Although the 10th never fired a shot at Gettysburg, they lost several men to the artillery barrage preceding Pickett’s Charge.

6th Corps Headquarters Flag 6C-3D

From the front of the monument:

10th Massachusetts

From the right side:

2nd Brigade
3rd Division
6th Corps

Monument to the 10th Massachusetts infantry at Gettysburg

From the rear of the monument:

July 2nd 1863

Flank markers for the 10th and 37th Massachusetts Infantry at Gettysburg

Flank markers for the 10th and 37th Massachusetts Infantry

See more on the 10th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry Regiment in the Civil War