Union monuments at Gettysburg > Wisconsin


The monument to the 7th Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry Regiment is west of Gettysburg on Meredith Avenue.(39.835747° N, 77.253888° W; Tour map: Stone and Meredith Avenues)

A marker southeast of Gettysburg on Culp’s Hill shows the regiment’s position on July 2 and 3. (39.819697° N, 77.223287° W; Tour map: Stevens Knoll; Google map to both monuments)

Monument to the 7th Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry Regiment on the Gettysburg battlefield

About the monument to the 7th Wisconsin Infantry

The monument is made of red granite on a granite base and stands 11′ 4′ tall. It is topped by the five-sided symbol of the Iron Brigade. On the front face is the circle symbol of the Union First Corps. Other symbols include an eagle over crossed flags on the right side, crossed rifles behind a knapsack on the front, and the Wisconsin state seal on the left side.

The monument’s material and symbols are identical and its design is very similar to that of the monument to the 6th Wisconsin. It was dedicated by the State of Wisconsin on June 30th, 1888.

The monument to the 7th Wisconsin is unusual in that it faces away from the park road. Meredith Avenue was realigned after the monument was placed and the monument still faces the old road alignment.

The 7th Wisconsin Infantry at the Battle of Gettysburg

The 7th Wisconsin was commanded at the Battle of Gettysburg by Colonel William W. Robinson. Robinson took over the brigade during the battle after Brigadier General Solomon Meredith was wounded, and Major Mark Finnicum then led the regiment.

The regiment reached the battlefield on the morning of July 1st and launched a counterattack against the Confederate Brigade of James Archer which started from the location of the monument and moved west. Archer was captured and his brigade suffered heavy casualties. But Confedrate reinforcements continued to arrive through the day and after several hours of heavy fighting the Union line north and west of Gettysburg collapsed.

The regiment’s survivors retreated south of Gettysburg to Cemetery Hill. They were then posted on the north flank of Culp’s Hill, which they held for the rest of the battle.

The Medal of honor as it looked at the time of the Civil War

Corporal Francis Coates was awarded the Medal of Honor “In action at Gettysburg, PA on July 1, 1863 for unsurpassed courage in battle where he had both eyes shot out.”

Official Records thumbnail
1st Corps Headquarters Flag 1C-1D

 

Monument to the 7th Wisconsin Infantry at GettysburgFrom the monument:

Iron Brigade

7th Wis. Vol. Inft’y.
1st Brigade, 1st Div. 1st Corps.
This monument marks one of the
advanced positions of the regt. in battle
July 1st 1863.
It went into action with 370 and lost
killed – 39
wounded – 103
missing – 52
total – 194

List of engagements: Cedar Mountain, Catlett’s Station, Rappahannock Station, Gainesville, 2nd Bull Run, South Mountain, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Fitzhugh’s Crossing, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Haymarket, Mine Run, Wilderness, Spottsylvania, North Anna, Tolopotomy, Bethesda Church, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Weldon Railroad, Hatcher’s Run, Gravelly Run, Five Forks and Appomattox C.H.

Position of Regt. July 2 & 3 indicated by stone marker on Culp’s Hill.

From the right side of the monument:

This regt. was mustered into the U.S. Service at Madison, Wis. Aug. 18. 1861 for 3 years. Reenlisted Dec. 28, 1863. Mustered out July 3rd 1865, having been in 25 battles.

Original strength 1029. Recruits 685.

Casualties:
Killed – 172.
Wounded – 761.
Died of wounds – 100.
Died of disease – 124.
Total 1157.

Wisconsin cherishes the memory of her brave sons.

Detail from the Monument to the 7th Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry Regiment on the Gettysburg battlefield

Detail of the Iron Brigade symbol from the top of the 7th Wisconsin monument

Marker for the 7th Wisconsin on Culp's Hill at Gettysburg

Marker for the 7th Wisconsin on Culp’s Hill

From the Culp’s Hill marker:

7th Wis. Vol. Inf’t.
July 2nd & 3rd 1863

See more on the 7th Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry Regiment in the Civil War