Union monuments at Gettysburg > Pennsylvania > Infantry 


There are two monuments and a position marker to the 106th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry Regiment at Gettysburg, marking the regiment’s location at various stages of the battle.

The 106th Pennsylvania Infantry at Gettysburg

The 106th Pennsylvania was commanded at the Battle of Gettysburg by Lieutenant Colonel William L. Curry, a Philadelphia paperhanger. It brought 335 men to the field, losing 9 killed, 54 wounded and 1 missing.

During the day on July 2nd several companies of the regiment were involved in heavy skirmishing along Emmitsburg Road and around the Bliss farm. As Longstreet’s attack made its way north in the late afternoon the regiment countercharged Wright’s Georgia Brigade.

In the evening of July 2 most of the 106th Pennsylvania was sent to East Cemetery Hill to help defend the Union batteries there. It arrived too late to take part in throwing back the Confederate attack but was not returned because the commanders there had no confidence in their own infantry. The location is shown by the position marker.

While most of the regiment was sent to Cemetery Hill two companies and a small detail were left behind near the Copse of Trees with the rest of the brigade and helped repel Pickett’s Charge on July 3rd. The monument by the Copse of Trees shows this location.

2nd Corps Headquarters Flag Attached to the 2nd Brigade2nd Division2nd Corps, Army of the Potomac 2C-2D

106th Pennsylvania Monument on Emmitsburg Road

The monument that is now by the Codori House on Emmitsburg Road was the original monument to the 106th Pennsylvania on the Gettysburg battlefield. It was erected at the Copse of Trees and dedicated in 1884 by the 106th Regimental Associtation. When state funding became available in 1889 to build a larger monument this one was moved to its present location on the east side of Emmitsburg Road just north of the Codori Farmhouse.

The Emmitsburg Road location commemorates the regiment’s activites on July 2nd, when several companies were engaged in heavy skirmishing along Emmitsburg Road during the day and in the evening the entire regiment countercharged Wright’s Georgia Brigade to this point, recapturing Union artillery pieces and taking many Confederate prisoners.

Facing east from the Emmitsburg Road, looking at the front of the 106th Pennsylvania Infantry monument. The Codori house is off camera on the right, and the State of Pennsylvania Monument cane seen in the distance

Facing east from the Emmitsburg Road, looking at the front of the 106th Pennsylvania Infantry monument. The Codori house is off camera on the right, and the State of Pennsylvania Monument can be seen in the distance.

From the front of the monument:

106 Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers
2d Brigade 2d Division 2d Corps
July 2d and 3d 1863.
Took into action
23 officers 263 men.

Loss.
Killed 1 officer 10 men.
Wounded 10 officers 49 men.
Missing 2 men.
Total 11 officers 61 men. 72.

106 Pennsylvania
Lieut. Colonel Wm L. Curry.

Erected by the Regimental Association

Left (north) side of the monument to the 106th Pennsylvania on Emmitsburg Road

Left (north) side of the monument to the 106th Pennsylvania on Emmitsburg Road

From the left (north) side:

July 2d
Morning.

Companies A & B on skirmish line.
Co. B. by order of Gen. Meade, ad-
vanced and uncovered enemy’s posi-
tion on Seminary Ridge.

Afternoon
Co. B advanced to Bliss House.
Held by 16th Miss. where it was
repulsed losing 1 officer, 11 men.

Later.
In connection with 4 companies of
12th N.J. again advanced and cap-
tured the Bliss House & number
of prisoners.

2d Brigade
Brig. Gen. Alex. S. Webb.

Looking south at the north side of the monument to the 106th Pennsylvania Infantry at Gettysburg. The Codori house is in the distance and Emmitsburg Road is on the right

Looking south at the north side of the monument. The Codori house is in the distance and Emmitsburg Road is on the right

From the right (south) side:

July 2d
Evening.
The regiment assisted in repelling the charge of Wright’s Georgia Brigade. Made a countercharge to the Emmittsburg Road, recapturing the guns of Browns Rhode Island Battery, and captured 250 prisoners, including Col. Gibson wounded, 5 captains and 15 lieutenants of the 48th Georgia.

The regiment except companies A and B and a detail of fifty men & three officers was subsequently ordered to reinforce the Eleventh Corps and was assigned position on East Cemetery Hill, supporting Battery, where it remained during the battle.

2d Corps
Maj. General W.S. Hancock.

view of the monument to the 106th Pennsylvania Infantry on Emmitsburg Road at Gettysburg

Rear (east) side of the monument to the 106th Pennsylvania on Emmitsburg Road

From the rear:

July 3d
The regiment with Eleventh Corps on East Cemetery Hill, except Companies A. B. and a detail of fifty men from the other companies who remained with Brigade at this point and assisted to repel Picketts charge.

The regiment also participated in the following battles.
Fair Oaks, Savage Station, Malvern
Hill, Antietam,
Fredericksburg,
Locust Grove, Wilderness, Po River,
Spottsylvania, Cold Harbor, Peters-
burg, Weldon R.R., Reams Station,
Boydton Road, Hatchers Run.
1861-1865

2d Division
Brig. Gen. John Gibbon.

Location of the monument on Emmitsburg Road

The first monument to the 106th Pennsylvania Infantry Regiment at Gettysburg is on the east side of Emmitsburg Road
just north of the Codori House. (39°48’42.1″N 77°14’23.7″W)

The 106th Pennsylvania monument at the Copse of Trees

Monument to the 106th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry Regiment on the Gettysburg battlefield

The famous Copse of Trees is behind the monument, with the High Water Mark monument on the left

The 106th Pennsylvania’s monument on Hancock Avenue is on the northeast edge of the Copse of Trees next to the High Water Mark monument. It was dedicated in 1889 by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. This is the second monument to the 106th Pennsylvania at this location. The original monument was placed by the regimental assocation in 1884. When state funding became available in 1889 the smaller statue was moved to its current location on Emmitsburg Road (see above) and this statue took its place.

Monument to the 106th Pennsylvania Infantry by the Copse of Trees at Gettysburg

Monument to the 106th Pennsylvania Infantry by the Copse of Trees at Gettysburg

The monument is carved from Quincy granite and stands over 12′ high. It is topped by the trefoil symbol of the Union 2nd Army Corps formed of drums and stacked knapsacks.

A brass bas-relief on the front of the monument shows the regiment’s countercharge towards the Codori house on July 2nd. Above the bas-relief a decorative row of 40 small trefoils – symbol of the Federal Second Corps – runs around the monument, representing the 40 rounds carried by each soldier.

From around the top of the monument:

106th Pennsylvania Infantry
Philadelphia Brigade
2d Brigade 2d Division 2d Corps

From the right side:

Position of the Regiment July 2, 1863. In the evening the Regiment assisted in repulsing a charge of the enemy on this line and made a counter charge to the Emmitsburg road in which 3 guns of Battery B, 1st Rhode Island were recovered and at the Codori House captured 250 prisoners.

The evening of July 2nd the Regiment moved to East Cemetery Hill to reinforce the 11th Corps and remained there as indicated by monument. During the 3rd, companies A and B continued here and assisted in repulsing the final assault of the enemy on the afternoon of the 3rd.

From the left side:

Present at Gettysburg 23 officers 312 men
Killed and died of wounds 2 officers 10 men
Wounded 8 officers 43 men
Captured or missing 1 man
Total 64
Mustered in August 28th 1861
Re-enlisted December 29th 1863

Mustered out June 30th 1865
Total enrollment 1020
Killed and died of wounds 9 officers 90 men
Died of disease etc. 1 officer 94 men
Wounded 24 officers 373 men
Captured or missing 5 officers 152 men
Total 39 officers 709 men
Total 748

Monument to the 106th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry Regiment on Hancock Avenue on the Gettysburg battlefield

From the rear:

Yorktown, Fair Oaks, Peach Orchard, Savage Station, Glendale, Malvern Hill, Flint Hill, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Haymarket, Gettysburg, Kelly’s Ford, Mine Run, Wilderness, Spotsylvania, North Anna, Totopotomy, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Strawberry Plains, Deep Bottom, Reams’ Station, Boydton Road, Hatcher’s Run Feb. 1865, Hatcher’s Run March 1865, Dabney’s Mill, Appomattox

Bronze tablet from the monument to the 106th Pennsylvania Infantry by the Copse of Trees at Gettysburg

Bronze tablet from the monument to the 106th Pennsylvania Infantry by the Copse of Trees at Gettysburg

Location of the monument at the Copse of Trees

The monument to the 106th Pennsylvania Infantry on Hancock Avenue is on the northeast edge of the Copse of Trees
next to the High Water Mark of the Confederacy. (39°48’45.3″N 77°14’08.3″W)

Position marker on Cemetery Hill

Position marker for the 106th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry Regiment at Gettysburg

A position marker on East Cemetery Hill  shows the regiment’s location on the evening of July 2 and during July 3. 

From the marker on Cemetery Hill:

Position held by the 106th Reg’t P.V.
2nd Brig. 2nd Div. 2nd A.C.
July 3, 1863

Organized Aug. 21, 1861
Mustered out June 30, 1865;
From Balls Bluff to Appomattox

“‘Your batteries can be withdrawn when that regiment runs away”

– Gen. O. O. Howard to Major Osborn

Position marker for the 106th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry Regiment at Gettysburg

Location of the position marker on Cemetery Hill

The marker showing the position of the 106th Pennsylvania Infantry on East Cemetery Hill is about 230 feet to the east of Baltimore Street on the northern boundary between National Park land and tour bus parking. (39°49’20.4″N 77°13’46.0″W)

The 106th Pennsylvania is also honored on the Philadelphia Brigade monument at Antietam.

See more on the history of the 106th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry Regiment in the Civil War