“Governor’s Guard”

The monument to the 66th New York Volunteers is south of Gettysburg on Sickles Avenue.(39.79727° N, 77.24505° W; Google map; Tour map: Sickles Ave. at the Rose Woods)

Monument to the 66th New York Infantry at Gettysburg

About the monument to the 66th New York

The monument was dedicated in 1889 by the State of New York. It is a shaft of Hallowell granite that stands 13′ 9″ tall. On its front above the base is an inset circular bronze tablet of the Seal of the State of New York. At the top of the front and rear is a bronze trefoil symbol of the Second Corps.

On the reverse of the monument is a large bronze tablet titled “Peace and Unity” showing a Union soldier sharing his canteen with a wounded Confederate and shaking his hand. (see below)

The 66th New York at Gettysburg

The 66th New York brought 176 men to the field. It was commanded at the Battle of Gettysburg by Colonel Orlando H. Morris, a lawyer from New York City. He was wounded while carrying the colors on July 2nd, and Lieutenant Colonel John S. Hammell took command until he, too, was wounded. Major Peter A. Nelson then took over the regiment.

On the afternoon of July 2nd Caldwell’s Division attacked south from Trostle’s Woods into the Wheatfield in support of Sickles’ Third Corps. The 66th New York was the center of three regiments in the first line of Zook’s Brigade in the attack.

The attack bogged down as Zook and a number of regimental officers were killed and wounded and the men became disordered due to the rough ground around the stony hill to the west of the Wheatfield. They were then struck on the flank by Wofford’s Confederate Brigade, forcing them back to Trostle’s Woods.

Official Records thumbnail
See Major Nelson’s Official Report on the 66th New York at Gettysburg
2nd Corps Headquarters Flag 2C-1D
Attached to the 3rd Brigade1st Division2nd Corps

 

Monuments along Sickles Avenue as it enters the Rose Woods on the Gettysburg battlefield

Monuments along Sickles Avenue as it enters the Rose Woods. From R to L, 5th Michigan, 66th New York (in center), headquarters of the 2nd Corps, 1st Division, 3rd Brigade, and 52nd New York

From the monument:

66th New York Infantry
3rd Brigade 1st Division 2nd Corps
—-
July 2, 1863
6 p.m.
—-
Casualties 
5 killed, 29 wounded, 16 missing.

Bronze tablet from the monument to the 66th New York titled "Peace and unity" shows a Union soldier sharing his canteen with a wounded Confederate and shaking his hand.

Bronze tablet from the monument titled “Peace and Unity” shows a Union soldier sharing his canteen with a wounded Confederate and shaking his hand.

See more on the 66th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment in the Civil War