Union Headquarters monuments > 2nd Corps


2nd Corps Headquarters Flag Attached to the 2nd Corps, Army of the Potomac.
The 2nd Division flag is the corps symbol, a trefoil, in white on a blue background.
2C-2D

 

The monument to the Second Division of the Second Corps is south of Gettysburg on Hancock Avenue. (39.810387° N, 77.235707° W; Google map; Tour map: Hancock Avenue Part 3)

The division was commanded at the Battle of Gettysburg by Brigadier General John Gibbon (USMA ’47), a career Army officer who was born in Philadelphia but grew up in North Carolina. Three of his brothers fought for the Confederacy and his cousin, J. Johnston Pettigrew, was mortally wounded in the Gettysburg campaign fighting for the Confederacy.

Gibbon was wounded at the height of Pickett’s Charge on July 3rd and the division was taken over by Brigadier General William Harrow, the First Brigade commander. Gibbon is honored by a nearby monument.

Monument to the 2nd Division of the 2nd Corps of the Army of the Potomac at Gettysburg

From the monument:

Army of the Potomac
Second Corps
Second Division
Brig. General John Gibbon
Brig. General William Harrow

First Brigade Brig. Gen. Wm. Harrow
Col. Francis E. Heath
Second Brigade Brig. Gen. A. S. Webb
Third Brigade Col. N. J. Hall
One Co. Mass. Sharpshooters

July 2. Arrived between 6 and 7 A. M. and went into position on line between Cemetery Hill and Round Top. Third Division on right and First Division on left. Second Brigade constituting the right Third Brigade the left and First Brigade in reserve. Sharp skirmishing continued through the day and artillery fire at intervals until near sunset when the Third Corps having been driven back Wright’s Georgia Brigade furiously attacked the Division and was repulsed with loss including many prisoners theTwelfth Corps coming to the support of the left.

July 3. Artillery firing until 9 A. M. and sharp skirmishing during the day. At 1 P. M. Confederates concentrated the fire of over 100 guns on the Second and Third Divisions and after two hours of uninterrupted firing charged with a force of over 15,000 infantry which was repulsed with great loss of life prisoners and flags. The Division remained in position with no further engagement than skirmish firing.

Casualties including Division Staff and attached troops Killed 25 Officers 319 Men Wounded 105 Officers 1097 Men Captured or Missing 6 Officers 95 Men Total 164.

Union Brigadier General john Gibbon

Union Brigadier General John Gibbon