The monument to Pogue’s Artillery Battalion is southwest of Gettysburg on West Confederate Avenue. (Monument map: West Confederate Avenue – Pt. 2) A marker shows the position of the battalion’s short-range howitzers, which operated independently some distance to the south. (Tour map: West Confederate Avenue – Pt. 3)

The battalion was commanded by William T. Poague, a lawyer from Rockbridge, Virginia.

Monument to Poague's Artillery Battalion of the army of Northern Virginia at Gettysburg

From the monument:

C. S. A.
Army of Northern Virginia
Hills Corps Pender’s Division
Poague’s Battalion
Ward’s Brooke’s Wyatt’s and Graham’s Batteries
Seven Napoleons
Six 12 Pounder Howitzers
One 10 Pounder Parrott
Two 3 Inch Rifles

July 2. Late in the evening ten of the guns were placed in position at different points ready for service next day. The Howitzers were kept in the rear as no place was found from which they could be used with advantage.

July 3. The ten guns were actively engaged.

July 4. In the evening about dusk began the march to Hagerstown.

Killed 2 Wounded 24 Missing 6 Total 32

Ammunition expended 657 rounds. Horses killed or disabled 17

Monument to Poague's Artillery Battalion of the army of Northern Virginia at GettysburgMarker for Poague's Artillery Battalion of the army of Northern Virginia at Gettysburg

From the marker:

C. S. A.
Army of Northern Virginia
Hills Corps Pender’s Division
Poague’s Howitzers

 July 2. The howitzers in the lunettes nearby belonged to the batteries of Poague’s Battalion. One to Ward’s. Two to Brooke’s. One to Wyatt’s. One to Graham’s. But on this day they were detached and kept under shelter from the fire of the Union artillery which they could not return by reason of their short range.

July 3. In the morning the lunettes were constructed and the howitzers placed in them to meet a possible advance of the Union forces but as this did not occur they took no active part in the battle.

July 4. At dusk they withdrew from the field with their battalion and began the march to Hagerstown.

Lt. Colonel William T. Poague

Lt. Colonel William T. Poague