The monument to Hoke’s Brigade of the Army of Northern Virginia is southeast of Gettysburg on East Confederate Avenue.

Brigadier General Robert Hoke had been wounded in May of 1863 at Chancellorsville, so at the Battle of Gettysburg the brigade was under the temporary command of Colonel Isaac Avery. Avery was from a large plantation family and before the war had been a partner in the construction of the Western North Carolina Railroad.

Colonel Avery was mortally wounded at the beginning of the attack on Cemetery Hill on the evening of July 2nd. Colonel Archibald C. Godwin took over the brigade after Avery was wounded.

The brigade also included the 54th North Carolina, which was detached to guard prisoners in Winchester and  did not accompany the army to Pennsylvania.

Monument to Hoke's North Carolina Brigade at Gettysburg

From the monument:

C. S. A.
Army of Northern Virginia
Ewell’s Corps Early’s Division
Hoke’s Brigade

6th 21st 57th North Carolina Infantry

July 1. Advanced at 3 P. M. with Hays’ Brigade flanked Eleventh Corps aided in taking two guns repulsed First Brigade Second Division and captured many prisoners. Late in evening took position here.

July 2. Skirmished all day at 8 P. M. with Hays’ Brigade charged East Cemetery Hill. Severely enfiladed on the left by artillery and musketry it pushed on over infantry line in front scaled the hill planted its colors on the lunettes and captured several guns. But assailed by fresh forces and having no supports it was soon compelled to relinquish what it had gained and withdraw. Its commander Col. Isaac E. Avery was mortally wounded leading the charge.

July 3. Ordered to railroad cut in rear and later to High Street in town.

July 4. At 2 A. M. moved to Seminary Ridge. After midnight began the march to Hagerstown.

Present about 900 Killed 35 Wounded 216 Missing 94 Total 345

Confederate Colonel Isaac Avery, mortally wounded on East Cemetery Hill at Gettysburg

Confederate Colonel Isaac Avery, mortally wounded on East Cemetery Hill at Gettysburg